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Being ruthless

Lot of time our system deals with abuse. For e.g. some customer will move the same file between 2 folders the whole day and normally it doesn't cause issues but in some extreme cases it would generates hundreds of thousands of records.  Also there are some customers who have bots written that will make millions of call in a day. Or sometimes some customer will put malware on FTP and use our servers as a way to spread malware, this causes antvirus to flag our site as spammers causing field issues. One of the strategy we use to deal with abuse is to throttle the user for a while but sometimes it hurts good users also. In some cases the abuse is so much that it can bring down the system or hurt other genuine users. Like in case of malware we just block the customer as there is not time to reach the customer and solve the issue, some user might have accidentally share the file but we have to be ruthless.

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